dcsimg

Corrections Majors Guide


Table of Contents

What Does it Mean to Study Corrections?

Students who earn a college degree in corrections and begin a career in this important field bear the responsibility of overseeing the criminal population and ensuring the safety of local citizens. The law enforcement and corrections field may seem intimidating at first, due to the regimented lifestyle and high level of accountability. There are many benefits, however, to working in law enforcement. For one thing, it's one of the fastest-growing job fields in the country.

Types of Corrections Degrees

A Criminal justice degree in Corrections major focus on counseling and rehabilitation of offenders, probation, parole, community corrections, and juvenile services. Corrections professionals have the opportunity to make a strong and lasting impact on those they oversee. They will confront dangerous situations and be offered opportunities to help improve lives. The knowledge and insight gained from a college degree program in corrections will prepare them for the challenges of a career in the field.

Close collaboration between teachers and students in this major is strongly encouraged. Students are also expected to gain experience through internships and job-shadowing programs. Internship experiences can help with networking during the job search after graduation. Some graduates of corrections degree programs work as correctional officers, correctional counselors, and community and court probation officers. Others have opted to specialize in sexual abuse response and child protection services.

Corrections

What You'll Learn in a Corrections Degree Program

College degree programs in corrections are designed to prepare students to obtain entry-level positions in the field. Upon graduation, students should understand the daily operations and functions of the criminal justice system. They should have the ability to recognize and analyze sociological factors that may increase the likelihood of crime. They should also understand how prisons and rehab facilities function -- their hierarchies, regulations and communications systems. Graduates should be familiar with constitutional processes and applicable law.

Online Degrees in Corrections

The flexibility of online degree programs makes education available to many students who already have jobs or families to support. By enrolling an online college degree program in corrections, students are able to control their own study and class schedules, and are not forced to relocate to a physical college campus.

The convenience of online education is especially important in the field of corrections because many high-security facilities are located in isolated and rural areas, far away from traditional universities and community colleges. Many correctional facilities offer continuing online education to staff, in tandem with services provided to prisoners going through rehab and remedial services.

Browse online degree programs in corrections.

Other College Degrees in Corrections

The requirements needed to embark on a career in law enforcement are as multi-faceted as the industry itself. Those interested in a career in federal corrections need to have a bachelor's degree in the field. A master's degree in criminal justice is also very helpful for future advancement. Interested candidates must be under the age of 37 because the mandatory retirement age is 57. By obtaining "Rule 24 Certification," a student may receive preferred consideration when entering the workforce. This certification program covers in-depth information about chemical dependency and is available online. In addition, corrections departments often hire individuals to complete Pre-Sentence Investigation Reports, an experience that would help any graduate during his or her search for a job. Volunteer experience in your particular area of interest is always a good addition to a resume.

Browse master's degree programs in corrections.

What Can You Do With a College Degree in Corrections?

The prospects for job opportunities for correctional officers are excellent. Thousands of jobs are expected to open each year due to a greater demand for correctional officers and the need to replace correctional officers who leave the profession or who retire. Many corrections facilities have had trouble attracting and retaining desirable job applicants. This may be due to low starting salaries and the saturation of the job market in rural areas.

As the population of inmates rises, employment opportunities for correctional officers are expected to grow. Mandatory sentencing, longer sentences, and shortened paroles will contribute to the growth of the inmate population. New jobs for correctional officers will also be created as new corrections facilities are built and existing facilities are expanded. The development of physical facilities will depend largely on the budgets of state and local governments. It is not uncommon for public corrections authorities to work with private companies in the provision of correctional facilities and corrections staff. This trend is expected to increase employment opportunities in the private sector.

Job security for a corrections officer is high. Because of the demand created by rising inmate populations, layoffs of corrections officers are extremely rare.

Work Environment

The regular responsibility of a corrections officer is to monitor people who have been arrested and are waiting for trial, or who have been convicted and sentenced. The corrections officer's job is to keep facilities secure. He or she must take measures to prevent violence and inmate escapes. The authority enjoyed by a corrections officer exists only within the institution or facility in which he or she works and must not be exercised outside of the workplace.

Corrections officers are sometimes known as detention officers and are employed in the police or sheriff's departments in county jails. It is common for corrections officers to find employment in this segment of the industry because about 75% of all jails are under the jurisdiction of a sheriff and are run by county government.

The inmate population of a jail is in constant flux. Prisoners are continually being released or transferred to prison, and new prisoners are constantly being brought in. Corrections officers who work in jails across the United States admit more than 11 million new offenders or potential offenders each year. The admittance process is the most dangerous part of the job, when recently arrested individuals are in danger of becoming violent.

Corrections officers in the United States collectively monitor the revolving population of the one million or so incarcerated people who continuously reside in jails and prisons. Though both kinds of facilities have dangerous elements, prisons are generally more stable environments than jails. Some corrections officers find employment with the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, monitoring individuals who are waiting to be released or deported. Some are employed in correctional institutions that are operated by private organizations.

The job of a corrections officer can be dangerous and difficult. Corrections officers must handle the possibility of having a confrontation with an inmate that could be potentially harmful. Some corrections facilities are well maintained, clean, well lighted, and ventilated. Other correction facilities, however, are overcrowded, hot, and in disrepair. Because there must always be security provided in corrections institutions, the schedule maintained by a corrections officer can be tiring. Officers must often work full days five days a week and frequently have to work overtime hours, overnight shifts, and on weekends and holidays.

Job duties

Corrections professionals are the front line of contact for the inmates under their supervision. A regular workday for a typical corrections professional could include the following:

  • Monitoring work activities and assignments for prison inmates
  • Inspecting cells and other areas for cleanliness
  • Searching inmates and cells for illegal items such as weapons and drugs
  • Inspecting locks, doors and other points of entry for signs of tampering
  • Screening visitors and mail for prohibited items
  • Serving meals and distributing hygienic items to prisoners
  • Escorting prisoners to places within the facility and outside locations such as courtrooms and medical facilities
  • Reporting on the work quality of inmates. Reports may be written or oral
  • Communicating rules to inmates in a clear, civil, but forceful manner
  • Using handcuffs, pepper spray, and other deterrents as needed in proper and safe manner
  • Interacting with inmates that are often confrontational and angry
  • Cooperating and communicating with co-workers
  • Convincing inmates to follow all regulations
  • Being constantly on guard and aware of inmate behavior that could have serious physical consequences
  • Working eight-hour days, weekends, and holidays
  • Being highly agile and able to move quickly in physically demanding situations
  • Seeking out and encouraging support from superiors and co-workers

Return to the top

Pursue your Corrections Major today…

Refine School Matches
Hide filters
  • SUBJECT Clear All

    See More

  • DEGREE

    See More

  • PROGRAM TYPE

  • START TIME

    LOCATION
    Please enter valid US or Canada Zip.

Searching Searching ...

Prefer exploring options talking to our staff?
Call toll free now: 1.855.330.6938
Matching School Ads
1 Program(s) Found
  • Many programs require externships, allowing students to gain real-world experience.
  • Approved A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau (BBB) since 1984.
  • Offers 22 accelerated, career-focused program options including business administration, medical assisting, and more.
  • Regionally accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).
  • 11 campuses across California, with an online division as well.
Show more [+]
  • Financial Aid
1 Program(s) Found
UEI College , Gardena
  • Dedicated to providing  career training since 1975.
  • Has 13 campus locations in Southern California and a campus in Morrow, GA.
  • Provides flexible class times including weekends.
  • Offers curriculum that ranges from 8 month diploma programs to 16-month Associate of Applied Science degree programs.
  • Has admissions professionals available to help students decide which diploma or degree program they should pursue.
  • Gives job placement assistance strengthened by relationships with local employers.
Show more [+]
Good for Working Adults
  • Accredited
  • Flexible Scheduling
  • Financial Aid
  • Transferable Credits
1 Program(s) Found
  • Has students attend one four-week class at a time and take their final exam before moving on to their next class.
  • Offers 24/7 online tech support, with a typical response time of 4 hours or less.
  • Has online help centers that offer assistance with writing, statistics, medical assisting, and more.
  • Provides job placement assistance to all its students and alumni.
  • Researches trends for growing fields to tailor a more effective curriculum.
Show more [+]
Good for Working Adults
  • Accredited
  • Online Courses
  • Flexible Scheduling
  • Financial Aid
1 Program(s) Found
Brightwood College , Bakersfield

About Brightwood College

Brightwood College offers accelerated programs that combine flexible schedules and professional instruction to create a rewarding learning experience for individuals focused on gaining the skills for specific careers. Brightwood College is owned and operated by Education Corporation of America.

About Education Corporation of America

Education Corporation of America's institutions broaden access to postsecondary educational opportunities.

1 Program(s) Found
  • A part of the Select Education Group (SEG).
  • Offers several scholarship and financial aid opportunities for students who qualify.
  • California campuses accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC), and accreditation for the Salem campus from the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET).
  • 4 Campuses located in Clovis, Modesto, and Redding in California, and Salem, Oregon.
Show more [+]
Good for Working Adults
  • Accredited
  • Flexible Scheduling
  • Financial Aid
  • Transferable Credits
2 Program(s) Found
  • Each year since 2004, The Princeton Review has included California University in its Best in the Northeast listing, recognizing Cal U as one of the best regional universities in the northeastern United States.
  • Ranked #35 in Best Online Graduate Education Programs by U.S. News and World Report in 2015.
  • Offers private school amenities at a public school cost.
  • Grants students in its Global Online program the same diploma as graduates from Cal U’s traditional degree programs.
  • Has an student-to-teacher ratio of 20:1.
Show more [+]
  • Accredited
  • Online Courses
  • Accelerated Programs
  • Financial Aid
  • Transferable Credits
1 Program(s) Found
Platt College , Riverside
  • A Los Angeles-based private college offering programs in medical sciences, legal studies, and graphic design since 1985.
  • Has weekend programs, including certified  veterinary technology, nurse assistant, and hemodialysis technician.
  • Showcases visual communication students’ artwork and design through campus magazine.
  • 3 campuses in Southern California.
  • Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC).
Show more [+]
Good for Working Adults
  • Accredited
  • Flexible Scheduling
  • Accelerated Programs
  • Financial Aid
  • Transferable Credits